Rabbit Hole: Rape Culture – Teens

From  Bustle’s “5 Prom Traditions That Perpetuate Rape Culture“:

Bustle’s article looks primarily at prom traditions supporting the idea that young women are targets for young teenage men (who are painted as sexual predators).  Problematic are traditions like insisting that young woman dress conservatively at prom (because they are objects and therefore responsible for inviting rape if they dress provocatively); and the traditional Dad-threatening-prom-date trope that makes only males responsible for the sexual safety of teenage young women.

askingforit
Cover of “Asking For It” by Louise O’Neill. Cover design by Kate Gaughran

According to one Kaiser Family Foundation study, one-third of boys and 23 percent of girls ages 15-17 feel pressure to have sex, and prom can exacerbate this. After-prom parties are often considered an opportunity for high schoolers to reach sexual milestones. This can lead students both to feel internal pressure and to put pressure on one another.

From  Psychology Today’s “Peer Pressure and Teen Sex“:

One in three boys ages 15-17 say they feel pressure to have sex,
often from male friends. Teen girls feel less pressure–only 23 percent
said they felt such coercion. Researchers questioned 1,854 subjects
between the ages of 13 and 24 in a national survey.

The study, released by the Kaiser Family Foundation, also found
that teens feel strong pressure to drink and try drugs. The study
findings show a need for sex education at a young age, say the study
authors.

From the SEICUS Fact Sheet in support of the Real Education for Healthy Youth Act:

The availability and quality of sexual health information and sexuality education varies drastically across the country. Less than half of all high schools and only 20% of middle schools in the U.S. provide all 16 of the CDC-identified topics critical to ensuring sexual health. (CDC) In addition, many young people face systemic barriers to accessing health information and services, resulting in persistent inequity and disparities. (CDC)

The data on disparities and disproportionate burden on young people continue to highlight the need for additional resources to serve young people most in need of sexual health education.

  • HIV infection rates are increasing among young people, particularly among young men who have sex with men (CDC) – young people under the age of 25 account for 1 in 5 new HIV infections. (CDC)
  • Half of the nearly 20 million estimated new STIs each year in the U.S. occur among people ages 15–24. (CDC)
  • Despite historically low unintended teen pregnancy and birth rates in the U.S., the country continues to have the highest rate of teen births among comparable countries. (UNICEF)
  • A devastating 10% of high school students report experiencing partner violence and/or sexual violence. (CDC)

Note: the CDC figure looks only at partner violence and sexual violence.  In terms of sexual assault of teens in general, the American Psychological Association reported in 2014 that 1 in 6 boys and 1 in 4 girls report having been sexually assaulted by age 18. (1)

  1. “Child Sexual Abuse: What Parents Should Know,” American Psychological Association. (http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/child-sexual-abuse.aspx) (February 19, 2014)

 

 

 

 

Rabbit Hole: ACP statement, Dr. McHugh, Leelah’s Law

Symbol-des-Tages_TransGender_2006-03-29From Think Progress:  Hate Group Masquerading as Pediatricians Attacks Transgender Youth:

As trans activist Brynn Tannehill pointed out in her own debunk of ACP’s statement, it appears to have been spearheaded by Dr. Paul McHugh of Johns Hopkins University. He is one of the only prominent doctors in the country that rejects transgender equality, distorting and rejecting research as is necessary to do so. Conservatives regularly rely on him to prop up their anti-trans talking points and he in turn contributes columns to their publications.

From Brynn Tannehill on Huffington Post: Johns Hopkins Professor Endangers Lives of Transgender Youth:

Somewhere out there, a parent will follow his advice. Or a court, or child protective services. We already know it happens when they do. We know the results from anecdotes and years of research, and it looks like Leelah Alcorn.

This isn’t just about academic freedom. It’s about the reputation of the institution. It’s about the moral obligation to do no harm.

And if all of those things are meaningless to Johns Hopkins administration, it’s also about liability. Someday, someone who followed McHugh’s advice, with your implied blessing, is going to show up on your doorstep with a lawyer and a dead child.

From Wikipedia: Death of Leelah Alcorn:

Leelah’s Law

A Facebook group called “Justice for Leelah Alcorn” was established,[56] while a petition calling for “Leelah’s Law”, a ban on conversion therapy in the United States, was created by the Transgender Human Rights Institute to raise awareness of the psychologically harmful effects of such practices; by January 24 it had 330,009 signatures,[47][57][58][59] and was named the fastest growing change.org petition of 2014.[60] A second appeal demanding the enactment of “Leelah’s Law” was posted to the We the People section of WhiteHouse.gov on January 3, 2015 which garnered more than 100,000 signatures as of January 30.[61] In response to the petition President Barack Obama called for the banning of conversion therapy for minors.[62] Under the Twitter hashtag #RealLiveTransAdult, many transgender people posted encouraging tweets for their younger counterparts,[63] while other hashtags, such as #ProtectTransKids, and the term “Rest in Power”, also circulated on Twitter.[9][64][65][66] A change.org petition was set up calling for Leelah’s chosen name to be included on her gravestone,[29] which gained over 80,000 signatures.[39] On January 6, Adam Hoover of Marriage Equality Ohio remarked that, since the request of having Alcorn’s chosen name on her gravestone seemed “like a slim possibility”, they would be raising money for a permanent memorial arranged as a bench, tree and commemorative plaque.[39] In April 2015, President Obama responded to the petition seeking to ban conversion therapy inspired by Alcorn’s death with a pledge to advocate for such a ban.[67]

In December 2015, Cincinnati became the second U.S. city after Washington D.C. to ban the practice of conversion therapy outright; council member Chris Seelbach cited Alcorn’s suicide as an influence in the decision, stating that “She challenged us to make her death matter, and we’re doing just that.”[68]

From #BornPerfect: Facts About Conversion Therapy:

All of the nation’s leading professional medical and mental health associations have rejected conversion therapy as unnecessary, ineffective, and dangerous. These groups have cautioned that the practices do not work and have warned patients that they may be harmful. For example, the American Psychological Association “advises parents, guardians, young people, and their families to avoid sexual orientation change efforts that portray homosexuality as a mental illness or developmental disorder and to seek psychotherapy, social support, and educational services that provide accurate information on sexual orientation and sexuality, increase family and school support, and reduce rejection of sexual minority youth.

To end conversion therapy, look at #BornPerfect: Laws and Legislation By State.  If your state doesn’t have a bill that’s been introduced yet, work with state representatives and senators to get a bill authored.  Also consider working directly with your city council.  Like the movement to legalize gay marriage, the end conversion therapy may need to start locally and as a grassroots effort.

Rabbit Hole is a regular feature that starts with one article and follows the links within that article to the next, and so on.  Look for more Rabbit Hole posts in the future.